Dilini's Ph.D. public lecture 2017-11-21

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Peter Jedicke
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Dilini's Ph.D. public lecture 2017-11-21

Post by Peter Jedicke » November 18th, 2017, 8:45 am

Many of us in RASC London Centre have worked on outreach projects with Dilini. Here's a chance to support her academically.

There will be a
PhD Public Lecture
on Tuesday 2017-11-21 at 13:00 in the Physics & Astronomy Building, room 100
by
Dilini Subasinghe
(Supervisor: Dr. Margaret Campbell-Brown)

Title:
Physical properties of faint meteors through high-resolution observations

Small, faint meteors (with masses between 10-7 and 10-4 kg) were once part of an asteroid or comet, and collide with Earth’s atmosphere daily. The ablation processes are poorly understood, as are the physical properties of the meteoroids. High-resolution optical observations have begun to provide insight into these processes while providing constraints for meteoroid ablation models.

In the first part of this work, wide-field and narrow-field optical observations of faint meteors were combined to determine what relationships, if any, exist between meteor light curve shapes, orbits, and fragmentation behaviour.

In the second part of this work, the luminous efficiency (the fraction of kinetic energy used for visible light production) of meteors was investigated. This parameter is crucial to determining meteoroid mass, and past results vary by up to two orders of magnitude. An attempt at determining luminous efficiency through the classical ablation equations was made, and verified on simulated meteor data, while quantifying the uncertainty in the method. This was then applied to fifteen real meteor events, observed with the Canadian Automated Meteor Observatory. This is the first study to ever compare photometric and dynamic meteoroid masses to determine luminous efficiency, with high-resolution observations.
Peter Jedicke, FRASC
London Centre Honorary President (1996-)

"Much is too strange to be believed, but nothing is too strange to have happened." (Thomas Hardy)

User avatar
Peter Jedicke
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Posts: 1379
Joined: November 27th, 2011, 4:53 pm
Member Name: Peter Jedicke
Location: London, Ontario
Has thanked: 86 times
Been thanked: 75 times
Contact:

Re: Dilini's Ph.D. public lecture 2017-11-21

Post by Peter Jedicke » November 23rd, 2017, 3:40 am

Update... Dilini was successful
http://blog.physics.uwo.ca/dilini-subas ... er-thesis/
Please join me in congratulating her and wishing her well
Peter Jedicke, FRASC
London Centre Honorary President (1996-)

"Much is too strange to be believed, but nothing is too strange to have happened." (Thomas Hardy)

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